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Old 05-08-2012, 06:12 PM   #21
masterofoneinchpunch
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Originally Posted by QueMuchita View Post
I was just reading his book and when he was speaking of The One-Armed Swordsman, he says that Wang Yu is "forced to chop off his own arm"......
I was taking notes on possible errata for the book and maybe a review and then just got tired of it:

Films of Fury (2011): The Kung Fu Movie Book by Ric Meyers

He does too much “the story goes” and “rumored”.

“I am not, as the Internet Movie Data Base does, going to refer him as Chia-Liang Liu … not when I know him as Liu Chia-liang. That is also the Cantonese version of his name. His name to Mandarin speakers is Lau Kar-leung, but I know him best by his Cantonese name, so that’s the one I’m using.” (11)
[two mistakes here; one big: he gets Cantonese and Mandarin confused; second small: it is Internet Movie Database (one word Database)]
“… chain whip (a linked series of blades)” (15)
[rods with one blade]
“Still, the Hong Kong film industry wasn’t very artistic during the 1950s and 1960s. Seemingly, just about the only man who seemed to know what to do with a camera was King Hu…” (pg. 34)
[yikes]
“As far as 1950s Hong Kong society was concerned, the only people who had any free time would be spoiled housewives, and their hard-working husbands didn’t want them ogling handsome hung heroes at the local cinema. So the local movie industry felt inclined to have women playing their male movie action heroes…” (pg. 35)
[ha ha, this of course completely ignore Kwan Tak-hing, no idea where he gets this information; contradicts later things in the book]
“The Orphan (1959)”(pg. 41)
[released 3/3/1960 according to HKFA]
“The Chinese usually made movies the way some people make cars – on an assembly line.” (Pg. 48)
[this statement bugs me though several companies did take this format]
“[on Fist of Fury] “Set in the Shanghai of the late 1920s…” (pg. 49)
[this has to be mid-late 1930s after the Battle of Shanghai (1937) correct or is it the earlier incident in Shanghai in 1932?; yeah I know Ho Yun Jia died in 1910; neither are in the 1920s though]
“… what could possibly be the problem? There were really only two: finding the bite-size truth amid the total fabrications and wild flights of fancy, then, perhaps more importantly, honoring Lee’s non-cinematic life’s work: the creation of jeet kune do.” (pg. 63)
“Even the best of subsequent kung fu films were relegated to critics Roger Ebert and Gene Siskel’s “turkey” or “stinker of the week” status on their syndicated movie review TV series through sheer, stubborn unwillingness to learn more.” (pg. 67)
[how true is this actually; Ebert himself has only reviewed a handful of films with Kung Fu in it and many times he has given positive reviews; need some actual mentions of films because otherwise it seems like he is knocking these two down just to prop himself up as someone who “understands” MA films]
“Starting out as Unique Film Productions in 1925, the company has always been controlled by the Shaw brothers – four siblings who also shared the name Run; Runje, Runde, Runme, and Run Run. While it has long been believed that the latter two monikers were somewhat condescending nicknames given to the youngest brothers by peers impressed with their errand boy skills at another Hong Kong studio, their handles were actually bestowed on them by their father, Shaw Yuh-hsuen, because the name meant “benevolence.”” (pg. 71)
[first it is 1924; second no idea where he gets his info that those names were condescending who believe that?; third they were not in Hong Kong as boys as Shaw Yuh Hsuen brought them up in Shanghai]
“It was in 1949 that Runde finally renamed the operation Shaw Studios…” (pg. 72)
[In 1951 Nanyang Studio took the name Shaw and Sons Ltd]
“He especially appreciated the wild emotions of Rebel Without a Cause (1955) and the cathartic violence of Bonnie and Clyde (1967). He couldn’t help but wonder what those two would look like, blended together and projected through a kung fu prism.
The result was The One-Armed Swordsman (1967)…” (pg 75-76)
[well the problem here is OAS was released 7/26/1967 and B&C was released in America after in Aug. 13, 1967; this statement makes no sense]

“Bolting for Golden Harvest almost the moment Return of the One-Armed Swordsman was done, he added insult to injury by making The One-Armed Boxer in 1971, followed by what many consider his best movie, Beach of the War Gods (1972)…” (pg. 77)
[can you name how many mistakes in this paragraph?]
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Old 05-08-2012, 09:13 PM   #22
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So Liu Chia Liang is Cantonese....thanks Rick for putting me right....always though it was Mandies but your never wrong...
Didnt Golden Swallow and a little insignificant movie Chinese Boxer come after Return of One Armed, and before Wang Yu fled to Golden.....no your never wrong Rick.

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Old 05-08-2012, 09:38 PM   #23
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Originally Posted by popsjnr View Post
So Liu Chia Liang is Cantonese....thanks Rick for putting me right....always though it was Mandies but your never wrong...
Didnt Golden Swallow and a little insignificant movie Chinese Boxer come after Return of One Armed, and before Wang Yu fled to Golden.....no your never wrong Rick.
Golden Swallow came before Return. Wang Yu's last for Shaws were My Son and Chinese Boxer
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Old 05-08-2012, 10:22 PM   #24
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Golden Swallow was 1969 and Return of One Armed 1968 which was first?? Even Meyers first book had them in the right order
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Old 05-08-2012, 10:34 PM   #25
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Golden Swallow was 1969 and Return of One Armed 1968 which was first?? Even Meyers first book had them in the right order
Golden Swallow was Spring 68, Return Spring 69.
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Old 05-08-2012, 10:46 PM   #26
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Golden Swallow April 4, 1968

Return of the One-Armed Swordsman February 28, 1969
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Old 05-08-2012, 10:47 PM   #27
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That's wierd coz every book I've seen that concerns this era of Shaws fliks, including Cinema of Vengeance-1974 (the best book by far) has Golden Swallow as 1969-I dont give a f##k about the Celestial covers coz those dates are usually wrong....so I'll disagree with you okay??!!
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Old 05-08-2012, 11:24 PM   #28
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Originally Posted by popsjnr View Post
That's wierd coz every book I've seen that concerns this era of Shaws fliks, including Cinema of Vengeance-1974 (the best book by far) has Golden Swallow as 1969-I dont give a f##k about the Celestial covers coz those dates are usually wrong....so I'll disagree with you okay??!!
No reason to get worked up

So far Wiki, Hong Kong Cinemagic, Love HK Film, IMDB, Far East Films, Kung FU CInema listing (http://www.kungfucinema.com/golden-swallow-1968) all have GS as 1968.
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Old 05-08-2012, 11:25 PM   #29
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He is right about Siskel & Ebert routinely trashing kung fu films. This was on the PBS Sneak Previews show in the 70s and early 80s. Among the Dogs of the Week were SHOGUN ASSASSIN, SEVEN GRANDMASTERS, A HARD WAY TO DIE and one of the Flying Guillotine films. Ebert loved to trash kung fu movies as he dismissed anything fun that played in black theaters. When it became more acceptable to praise or write straight reviews of these films in the 90s, Ebert joined the in-crowd.
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Old 05-08-2012, 11:42 PM   #30
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He is right about Siskel & Ebert routinely trashing kung fu films. This was on the PBS Sneak Previews show in the 70s and early 80s. Among the Dogs of the Week were SHOGUN ASSASSIN, SEVEN GRANDMASTERS, A HARD WAY TO DIE and one of the Flying Guillotine films. Ebert loved to trash kung fu movies as he dismissed anything fun that played in black theaters. When it became more acceptable to praise or write straight reviews of these films in the 90s, Ebert joined the in-crowd.
Are there some direct links (not secondary) on Ebert trashing those films? (I can easily believe Siskel saying that though and technically SHOGUN ASSASSIN is not a kung fu film :)) None of those films are currently on Ebert's archive.

Ebert did give thumbs up to the following:

Infra-Man ***
Mighty Peking Man ***

All Available Ebert's Hong Kong and co-production reviews
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